Category Archives: Hardware

Asus to release mining motherboard with 19 PCIe slots

Asus has announced plans to release a motherboard aimed squarely at cryptocurrency miners. The new mainboard will be dubbed the B250 Expert Mining and features a whopping 19 PCIe slots. In addition to theoretical support for up to 19 GPUs, the board features a unique power setup and diagnostic tools designed to make troubleshooting initial setup easier. Sounds like ASRock’s H110 Pro BTC+ board will have a short reign as the top pick for rig builds looking to maximize GPU count.

Anandtech posted an preview of the upcoming board this morning; head over there for some more details and photos.

Asus hasn’t yet specified pricing or a release date, but are expected to shortly.

New AMD Vega GPUs yield disappointing mining performance out of the box

Reviews of AMD’s new Vega GPUs are starting to become available from reputable sources, and early mining test results don’t look great. Tom’s Hardware posted a first look of a Radeon RX 64 Vega (8GB) card yesterday, and only managed to hit 30.9 MH/sec on the latest version of Claymore’s miner. That’s comparable to performance of BIOS-optimized RX 4xx/5xx cards, and they draw considerably less power.

Keep in mind that these are out-of-the-box results, and no doubt higher speeds will be achieved once miners are able to experiment with clock speed and BIOS settings. But even if modders are eventually able to coax 40 MH/sec from Vega GPUs, they’ll probably never be a top-tier choice for miners, given their power consumption and high up-front cost ($599+ MSRP, although they’re currently selling for over $1,000 on Amazon).

TP-Link’s HS110 Smart Plug: the mining rig accessory you didn’t know you needed

Last weekend, I took a few days to visit with family in another state. Shortly after arriving, I noticed that I had an alert from nanopool.org indicating that my mining rig was offline. I didn’t pay much attention to it, as I’ve received a few false positives before, and my rig hadn’t crashed in nearly 90 days.

When I had time later that evening, I checked on my miner and found that it indeed hadn’t submitted any work in hours. I grabbed my laptop, logged into my miner remotely via SSH, and found that one of the GPUs had crashed—causing Claymore to hang (my guess is that my switch to dual-mining the previous week was enough to introduce some instability). No problem, a quick “sudo reboot now” at the prompt should be enough to get it running again, and I could troubleshoot the cause when I returned home in a few days.

Except my miner never came back online. Since I’d be away for three additional days, the missed mining time would cost me about $80. I needed a reliable way to remotely power cycle my rig in the event that something like this happened again in the future.

Enter the TP-Link HS110 Smart Plug. This simple device is exactly what I was looking for: a remotely-accessible power switch for my rig that I can control with my phone from anywhere. Read on for my mini review!