Monthly Archives: June 2017

TP-Link’s HS110 Smart Plug: the mining rig accessory you didn’t know you needed

Last weekend, I took a few days to visit with family in another state. Shortly after arriving, I noticed that I had an alert from nanopool.org indicating that my mining rig was offline. I didn’t pay much attention to it, as I’ve received a few false positives before, and my rig hadn’t crashed in nearly 90 days.

When I had time later that evening, I checked on my miner and found that it indeed hadn’t submitted any work in hours. I grabbed my laptop, logged into my miner remotely via SSH, and found that one of the GPUs had crashed—causing Claymore to hang (my guess is that my switch to dual-mining the previous week was enough to introduce some instability). No problem, a quick “sudo reboot now” at the prompt should be enough to get it running again, and I could troubleshoot the cause when I returned home in a few days.

Except my miner never came back online. Since I’d be away for three additional days, the missed mining time would cost me about $80. I needed a reliable way to remotely power cycle my rig in the event that something like this happened again in the future.

Enter the TP-Link HS110 Smart Plug. This simple device is exactly what I was looking for: a remotely-accessible power switch for my rig that I can control with my phone from anywhere. Read on for my mini review!

Dual mining with Claymore

Mine SC, DCR, LBRY, or Pascal alongside ETH with Claymore's miner!If you’ve followed my Ethereum mining guide and successfully set up your own rig, you may have noticed that the Claymore mining software we’re using supports a dual-mining mode. The premise of dual-mining sounds great: mine another altcoin alongside ETH, ostensibly for free. Sounds like an easy way to increase profitability without any downside, so shouldn’t we all take advantage?

Read on for the pros and cons of dual-mining with Claymore, and instructions to guide you through enabling it.

Global shortage of AMD GPUs due to cryptocurrency mining

If you’re looking to get your hands on an AMD RX 570/580 GPU, you’re probably out of luck—at least for the foreseeable future. News outlets (even mainstream media!) are reporting that AMD GPUs are basically sold out globally due to tremendous demand from cryptocurrency miners. If you’re able to find an AMD RX 470/480/570/580 GPU at all these days, it’ll probably be on the secondary market—where you can expect to pay double or triple retail price.

I initially recommended AMD GPUs in my mining guide because they were much cheaper than nVidia alternatives. But given current market conditions, consider nVidia GPUs if you’re building a mining rig today. A GTX 1070 GPU will roughly match the ETH mining performance of a RX 570/580, and they’re still available to buy at most retailers. Just remember that if you opt for an nVidia GPU and plan to follow my mining guide, you’ll need to install nVidia GPU drivers instead of the AMD ones that I’ve linked!

PSA: don’t store your cryptocurrency in online exchanges!

I just read this sobering tale about a guy who lost $8,000+ worth of cryptocurrency after being hacked. I’ve said it before, but this bears repeating: don’t trust anyone to hold your cryptocurrency for you. Online exchanges aren’t banks, and leaving your digital currency under somebody else’s control leaves you vulnerable to hacks like this one.

I wrote a wallet security guide a few years ago, and the basic principles are the same today: keep your coins in wallet addresses that you control, back up your wallet keys, and store multiple copies offline. If you don’t want to deal with manually securing your keys, you may want to invest in a hardware wallet (like the Trezor or Ledger Nano S—both support BTC, LTC, ETH, and other coins).

The author of the story that prompted this post offers some additional pieces of good advice, such as not making it obvious that you hold cryptocurrency on social media, and using a separate secret email address when dealing with exchanges.